Child Custody Basics – Rights, Residency, and Relationship

Child custody is a legal term sometimes used by family courts to describe the rights and obligations of divorced parents and their minor children, children’s residence or placement, and the relationship and/or amount of interaction with each parent that children have. see this When divorced parents are unable to compromise on these topics, the daunting task of deciding the appropriate custodial arrangement of the children and parenting plan for the parents is frequently left to family courts. The more parents understand what the determinations of child custody entail, the better educated they will be after a divorce when making decisions about their children.

Parent Rights and Responsibilities

Increasing parent’s rights and obligations to their minor children include decisions on the children’s upliftment and general welfare on issues such as education for girls, medical treatment, dental care and religion. These rights and obligations are generally called children’s legal custody.

Kid placement or citizenship

Children’s residence or placement applies to where the children will stay and spend the bulk of their time. Many times a child lives more with one parent than the other and the parent that the child lives with the most will usually be responsible for the child’s day-to-day care. In certain cases , the child will live with both parents equally, close to both parents equally, or live a considerable amount of time with each parent and the parents will share in the child’s duties and day-to-day care. Child residence or placement, and day-to-day child care are generally referred to as children’s physical custody.

The children have a relationship and/or amount of interaction with each parent

In situations where the child resides or primarily lives with one parent, visitation is sometimes referred to as the time spent with the other parent. The parent with whom the child resides with more is sometimes referred to as the parent with the custody and the parent with the visitation is referred to as the parent without the custody. For these cases, the parent who is not in custody may usually have a visiting schedule outlining their interaction with the children. Often, the visitation schedule is considered a parental plan.

When divorced parents are unable to agree on the rights and responsibilities of the parents and their minor children, the residency or placement of the children, and the relationship and/or amount of contact that the children have with each parent, the family courts are often left with the difficult task of determining the best child custody arrangement and the parenting plan. The more parents understand what the determinations of child custody entail, the better educated they will be after a divorce when making decisions about their children.